Questions About The Proper Way To Texture Some Not Straight Walls (Practicing Making Envrionments)

As a learning exercise and not for an actual game, I’m trying to recreate a room from the original 1993 Doom (just the environment, not enemies or player), and I’m not sure how best to approach mapping this metal wall texture to this wall.

I see a lot of different options that have different pros and cons, and I’m not sure of the best way to go with, cause I’m trying to practice for eventually making actual level environments and want to do it the right “professional” way.

First image is from Ultimate Doom Builder:

r/Unity3D - Questions About The Proper Way To Texture Some Not Straight Walls (Practicing Making Envrionments)

Second is my current recreation:

r/Unity3D - Questions About The Proper Way To Texture Some Not Straight Walls (Practicing Making Envrionments)

And here’s the texture in question:

r/Unity3D - Questions About The Proper Way To Texture Some Not Straight Walls (Practicing Making Envrionments)

And here’s a top-down of the wall showing that it’s not a perfect straight line to the grid which complicates things:

r/Unity3D - Questions About The Proper Way To Texture Some Not Straight Walls (Practicing Making Envrionments)

I know Unity is a very different engine to how Doom was made and I’m not going to get it exactly 1:1, but the wall in Doom cuts off and restarts the texture at each turn, and I want to copy that on purpose.

So with the mesh of the wall itself, should the entire wall be one mesh, or should each wall segment be individual meshes? And if they are individual meshes, would you make multiple objects in 1 Blender file (or whatever modeling program you use), or have a separate model file imported for each wall segment? Going individual may be better to texture, but seems like it would be a lot harder to modify later, if hypothetically you decided you wanted the walls to be slightly taller, you’d have to manually edit each one and make sure they all line up.

Then with textures and materials, either the entire wall could be one single material, or each segment could have its own material, which sounds more bloated and messy, but possibly less complicated to configure. Then mapping the texture as part of the material could be done with some complicated worldspace or objectspace shader setup, or in Blender you could meticulously line up each face UV so that the texture would line up perfectly on each segment, but would have to make sure all the sizes match up perfectly so the texture isn’t stretched or slightly too big on one segment. But then what happens if you decide you want to make one wall longer? Then it could all be thrown off and you may have to readjust all of them again.

There’s also the argument of making the whole level, textured and all, entirely in Blender and imported into Unity as one file of split meshes, but that doesn’t scale well. That seems hard to test and make small changes to while playtesting, and making any change will take longer and longer waiting to reimport.

When you have straight walls and floors, I know you can make modular pieces to stick together, but the curve is throwing me off (even the right wall isn’t on a straight line). And I’m trying to find the best way to build this in a way that would also work in a real scenario where I’m not just copying a level floorplan, but actually building some new level, and do it in a way that’s not a huge pain to modify and make small adjustments to. Even moving a wall and then having to realign the floor and ceiling sounds like a hassle with the way I’m going about it.

I’ve done a lot of 3d modeling over the years, but 90% of the time with low poly non-textured environments or grid-based levels, and am trying to go out of my comfort zone. Anyway, was just hoping to get some advice from people who actually know what they’re doing with this kinda stuff!